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I am Sibylla Brown.  I was born in Germany in 1940.  In 1946 my father, a German Operation Overcast scientist, was brought to the U.S. My family followed him to the U.S. in 1947, settling in Cedar Rapids Iowa in 1950.  I married my husband, Bill in 1962.  Bill practiced dentistry in Des Moines for over 40 years. In 1993 we sold our house in Des Moines and moved to a 200 acre farm in Decatur County, Iowa.  Except for a small vineyard we had no plans to farm our land.  But we did want to take care of it, particularly the overgrown oak and hickory woodlands.  We began timber stand improvement in 1993.   When we learned our land was actually a rare oak savanna remnant we implemented prescribed fire.  I keep monthly journals to record our activities and observations.  These posts summarize them.

FIELD JOURNAL: July 2016

After just over one inch of rain in June, we had 6.57 inches rain in July.
July turned into a very good mushroom month with abundant fruiting of ectomycorrhizal fungi.  Green, red, black, and yellow Russulas (brittle caps)  fruited heavily throughout the East Savanna woodlands with Russula variata, R. ochraleucoides, R. virescens, and R. nigricans being the most abundant. We collected the first Golden chanterelles on July 15. They continued to fruit the rest of the month.

Several boletes (mushrooms with pores instead of gills) fruited as well.  I was particularly pleased to find three Rubroboletus rhodosanguineus specimens on a white oak hillside. This large red bolete has a red pore surface which ages to a dull coral-red. The golden yellow stalk is covered by a blood red reticulum that terminates into a darker red base. The stalk, the pore surface, and flesh instantly bruise blue.  The Timberhill specimens are the only Iowa record for this species.   An herbarium search found only 11 USA records:   West Virginia, New York, and Iowa.

Boletus rhodosanguineus

Rubroboletus rhodosanguineus

Another interesting July find was Boletus spadiceus var. gracilis which fruited along the southeast woodland trail. Also an uncommon species this small yellow-brown bolete fruited abundantly in July. I found eleven specimens on July 27.  It is easily identified by the emerald-green flash reaction to a drop of ammonium hydroxide on the cap. A mycorrhizal partner of eastern North American hardwoods this bolete is distinguished from Boletus spadiceus which is only found in coniferous woodlands.

Boletus spadiceus var. gracilis

Boletus spadiceus var. gracilis

I don’t often see the Indigo milky cap (Lactarius indigo) at Timberhill.  And when I do it’s never where one would expect to see it.  Mycorrhizal with oaks and pines it usually occurs in mixed hardwood-coniferous woodlands. However, I usually find it in our prairie openings.  This specimen was fruiting at the base of big bluestem grass next to a scrub shingle oak in the West Creek virgin prairie remnant.  When cut this milky cap exudes bright blue milk.

Lactarius indigo, Indigo milky cap

Lactarius indigo, Indigo milky cap

As you can see in this photo the milk has turned the white flesh bright blue.  (And has stained my fingers blue.)

FIELD JOURNAL: June 2016

 

Timberhill Aerial Map

Timberhill Aerial Map

I’ve always hated dogbane. Although it’s a native plant it spreads like a weed, particularly in newly opened woodlands. In the East Savanna is has spread over the hillside where more conservative plants such as Wild hyacinth (Camassia scilloides) flourish and False hellebore (Veratrum woodii) are well established. It has also filled in the understory in the white oak and bur oak savanna we are restoring in our West 40 unit. But now that I have observed how much the butterflies love it I have come to treasure each patch of flowering Dogbane. In June I saw not only Coral and Edward’s hairstreaks on Dogbane, but Bronze and Gray coppers as well.

June was a good month for Hairstreak butterflies. On the 23rd we counted 10 specimens in under an hour. Most were on butterfly milkweed but we did see an Edward’s hairstreak nectaring on leadplant. And I finally collected a Hickory hairsteak. Larvae of this rare species consume shagbark hickory. Although this tree is abundant at Timberhill I had never seen a Hickory hairstreak. It is difficult to distinguish from Banded hairsteak. The difference between the two is that the inner band of dots (post median) on the Hickory hairsteak is wider along the leading edge and is white edged on both sides.

Hickory Hairstreak

Hickory Hairstreak

Banded hairstreak

Banded hairstreak

Great spangled fritillaries and Hackberry emperors were the most abundant butterfly species here in June. It was not unusual see 50 Hackberry emperors puddling in West Creek and over a hundred Great spangleds in flight. We saw the first Regal fritillary on butterfly milkweed on June 27. Also flying in June were the Horace’s and Wild indigo duskywings.

A friend visited for two nights of mothing and a day of butterlies in June. When we were observing hairstreaks on West Creek dogbane I was surprised to see a Hummingbird clearwing moth land nearby. Although the Snowberry clearwing is fairly common at Timberhill I’d never seen the Hummingbird clearwing. My mothing friend was surprised by the abundance of Leopard moths at Timberhill. He counted 10 specimens on the second night. Being a novice I had no idea this was unusual. Also of note was a Spiny oak-slug moth that came to his lights. I sighted another on June 27.

Hummingbird clearwing moth (Jim Durbin photo)

Hummingbird clearwing moth (Jim Durbin photo

Spiny oak-slug moth (Jim Durbin photo)

Spiny oak-slug moth (Jim Durbin photo)

Because of the hot, dry weather in June summer mushrooms were non existent. In 2014 and 2015 golden chanterelles fruited here from mid-June into September. We certainly miss the chanterelle frittatas and Girolles a la forestiere, Jane Grigson’s preparation of chanterelles, new potatoes, and bacon.

The first week of June I woke up to a whip-poor-will singing in the south meadow. A nice way to start the day.

 

FIELD JOURNAL: May 2016

 

Timberhill Aerial Map

Wildflower bloom continued to be spectactular in May. I’ve never seen the spring wildflowers so abundant. Plants that used to be limited have now spread throughout the East Savanna. When we began restoration Cream wild indigo was confined to a small patch along a fence line in the northernmost  East Savanna ridge top. Now it has not only spread across the entire ridge top but also to the next two ridges to the south. On the second ridge a few Dwarf larkspurs (Delphium tricorne) at the base of a white oak have spread over the  entire upper hillside.  Yellow pimpernel used to be confined to a nose slope above Brush Creek.  It now blooms throughout the East Savanna woodlands.

Bumblebee nectaring on Cream wild indigo

Bumblebee nectaring on Cream wild indigo.  Bumblebees are particularly fond of this plant.

The first time I saw Purple twayblade orchids here they were blooming between two white oaks west of our driveway.  There were only two plants.  Now they also bloom throughout the East Savanna, some in clumps of twenty or more specimens.  Although this is a common  orchid its presence indicates that a sight’s natural quality has been restored.  Both the twayblade and Yellow lady’s slipper orchids were blooming the May 21.

Bill and I were pleased to see an abundant population of Juvenal’s duskywing butterflies again this year.  We saw them puddling in West Creek, flying out of the woodlands into the prairie openings, and nectaring on Lousewort.  Our first of the year Buckeye was sighted on May 22  in the West Creek field.  Its larval food source, Slender false foxglove, is plentiful in this field so the Buckeyes will become more numerous as the season unfolds.  The colors of a Great spangled fritillary seen on May 26 were so vibrant I mistook it for a Regal fritillary when I first spotted it.

Juvenal's duskywing

Juvenal’s Duskywing

I saw the first Giant swallowtail butterfly on May 12.  Sightings of this species became more frequent each day.  Interestingly I didn’t see a Tiger swallowtail until May 23.  They are usually earlier and more numerous than the Giants swallowtails. Last year the FOY Tiger swallowtail was on April 16 and the FOY Giant swallowtail was on May 25.

Moths were flying in abundance in May.  Our first Luna moth of the year came to a moth light on May 6.  The next night we saw four specimens.  Polyphemus moths, Lettered,   Laurel sphinx, and Blinded sphinx moths were also spotted last month.  A Pink striped oak worm moth was the best find of the month. This moth has only been collected in two other Iowa counties (Linn and Van Buren).

Pink-striped Oakworm Moth

Pink-striped Oakworm Moth

The summer mushroom season began on May 24 when I saw the first of the year Stalked scarlet cap, Entire Russula, and Deep root mushrooms.  Along the West Creek bottom Eyelash cup, Scutellinia umbrorum, a small (.05-1 cm) orange cup fungus with a fringe of brown hairs was again fruiting on rotted wood.  There is only one Iowa herbarium record of this mushroom (1903). It is probably overlooked because of its small size.

In the West Creek prairie remnant Bill and I were pleased to see a Bobolink breeding pair again this year.  The Henslow’s sparrow colony is also nesting there this year.

FIELD JOURNAL: April 2016

That thing the nature of which is totally unknown to you is usually what you need to find, and finding it is a matter of getting lost.”

I’ve been reading Rebecca Solnit’s marvelous collection of essays, A Field Guide to Getting Lost. The above quote is from the first essay, “Open Door”. (attributed to pre-Socratic philosopher Meno). It describes exactly where I was in April – completely lost trying to identify moths that came to baited trees. Determined as I am to collect and identify as many Timberhill butterflies and moths (Lepidoptera) as possible I knew that I would soon be lost.  I can usually find my way among the silk moths, underwings, flower moths, and stem borers but am blinded among Pinions, Sallows, Cloverworms, Quakers, etc. What makes it all the more difficult is the variation among specimens of the same species.  These two photos of the common Speckled green fruit worm moth illustrate the difficulty.  I downloaded six photos of this species before I realized they were all the same species.

Photo of Speckled Green fruit worm moth taken on April 14

Photo of Speckled Green fruit worm moth taken on April 14

Same species photographed on March 23

Same species photographed on March 23

Moths seen and identified in April: Elaphria grata, Grateful midget, Eupsilia vinulenta, Straight-toothed sallow, Hypena scabra, Green clover worm moth, Lithophane atennata, Ashen pinion, Lithophane bethunei, Bethune’s pinion, Melanolophia canadaria, Canadian melanolophia, Mythimna unipuncta, Armyworm, Orthosia hibisci, Speckled green fruit worm moth, Zale gbalbanata, Maple sale, Sphecodina abbottii, Abbot’s sphinx, Drepana arcuata, Arched hooktip, Pero ancetaria, Huber’s Pero.

We saw the first spring azures on wing April 3 when the thermometer topped out at 83’ F. A black swallowtail was sighted the next day. On April 11 we saw the first Juvenal’s duskywing, a small black skipper.  Interestingly the moth baited trees attracted an abundance of Red Admirals and only one Comma butterfly on April 13. This was just the opposite of what we observed on March 23 when we saw nineteen commas and only one Red Admiral.  The first Meadow fritillary sightings were on April 19: one in the restored meadow and one puddling in the creek.

April Butterflies: American lady, Black swallowtail, Eastern and Gray commas, Juvenal’s duskywing, Meadow fritillary, Mourning cloak, Orange sulphur, Pearl crescent, Red Admiral, Red-spotted purple, Spring Azure.

I’ve never seen the spring ephemerals as spectacular as they are this year. Bluebells fill the lower portion of every hillslope, thousands of wild hyacinth are blooming in the east savanna, and bloodroot has moved uphill to the East Savanna ridge top. Of particular note is the abundance of Sandwort, Moehringia (Arenaria) lateriflora. In 2004 I found a small population in the prairie opening below the Hickory Grove. This year it covers one third of the prairie with its small white blossoms. Sandwort has a strong affinity to high quality oak-hickory woodlands and prairie openings (COC=10). We’re very pleased to find it so abundant here.

Sandwort, Moehringia (Arenadia) lateriflora

Sandwort, Moehringia (Arenadia) lateriflora

As usual the morels didn’t behave as expected. The warm weather in early April should have stimulated fruiting by the second week. But we lacked adequate precipitation – only .49 inches rain until April 18 when we had .32 inches.  That was enough to get things going and we found our first specimen in Hickory Grove on April 19.  In Iowa morels one usually looks for morels around dying and dead elm and cottonwood trees.  But in the Hickory Grove they are associated with scrub shingle oak and mayapples. So far fruiting has been very scattered.  Of the four Timberhill morel habitats we have found morels in only two. We had plenty of rain the week of April 24 (1.5 inches) but the temperature dropped into the 40’s each night and stayed in the 50’s during the day and fruiting ceased.  It will be interesting to see what develops the first week of May when warm, sunny days are predicted.

FIELD JOURNAL: March 2016

Unusually warm weather in December through February extended into March with temperatures averaging 6 degrees above normal. Spring got off to an early start. On March 11 I saw the first Spring Azure butterflies on wing. Last fall butterfly-moth bait that we had painted on shagbark hickories in the Hickory Grove attracted multitudes of Eastern Comma butterflies.  Curious to learn if they had overwintered under the hickory bark we  baited these trees again. Beginning March 14 the Commas and an occasional Red Admiral were attracted to the bait whenever the temperature climbed above 50’F. On March 23 I counted 19 Commas on baited trees.

Three comma butterflies on shagbark hickory

Three comma butterflies on shagbark hickory on March 24, 2016

The spring ephemerals also put on an early show. Bloodroot began blooming on the east facing hillsides above Brush Creek on March 15. On March 17 Midland Fawn Lily, Erythronium mesochoreum, was blooming in sunlit spots on the south facing Hickory Grove trail. The bloom quickly spread into the Timberhill open woodlands and oak openings. With it’s narrow, conduplicate (folded lengthwise), blue-green leaves this species is easily distinguished from the White Trout Lily, Erythronium albidum. The latter has wider mottled, flat leaves, and blooms later. I did not see any White Trout Lily leaves until March 31. (As of that date it had not bloomed at Timberhill.) The two plants can also be distinguished by the mature fruits: E. mesochoreum fruits rest on the ground while E. albidum fruits are usually held erect.

European honeybee nectaring on Bloodroot

European honeybee nectaring on Bloodroot

According to Robert B. Kaul’s paper “The Status of Erythronium albidum and E. mesochoreum” the distribution of the latter is much smaller than E. albidum.  It is restricted to “virgin tall-grass prairies and occasionally in woodlands.” Steyermark describes E. mesochoreum habitat as “glades, prairies, or dry open woods” whereas E. albidum is found in “low, moist woods, along streams, valleys, on slopes and wooded bluffs.” At Timberhill we found  E. mesochoreum in the open woodlands, native prairies, and oak openings.

Midland Fawn Lily, Erythronium mesochoreum

Midland Fawn Lily, Erythronium mesochoreum

Leaves of White Trout Lily, Erythronium album

Leaves of White Trout Lily, Erythronium album

Also blooming in March were Spring Beauty, Rue Anemone, Dutchman’s Britches, Toothwort, and False Rue Anemone. With the warm weather I had hoped to find the first morels which have fruited here as early as March 27.  No such luck.  We’ll have to wait for April.

Wild turkeys foraging in burned woodland

Wild turkeys foraging in burned woodland-prairie interface

A small flock of wild turkeys took advantage of the burned prairie and woodland north of the pond. The lack of cover made it easier for them to find acorns and hickory nuts to feed on. (It was too early in the year for grasshoppers, their favorite food.) Great blue herons returned to the pond the first week in March. They nest in cottonwoods along the Weldon River to the south and are frequently observed feeding in our well-stocked pond.